Kids for Kalang art project

Spectacular Wompoo Fruit Doves rely on the forest fruit and dense forest canopy shelter to survive. Photo Peter Hardinge
Spectacular Wompoo Fruit Doves rely on the forest fruit and dense forest canopy shelter to survive. Photo Peter Hardinge

A colouring-in project designed to raise awareness about the threat logging poses to the creatures living in our forests kicked off in Bellingen on Thursday.

Beautiful colour-by-numbers illustrations by well known local artist Susie Peake have been distributed to the Youth Hub and shops in Bellingen such as IGA, Kombu and Weave.

Following the artist's precise instructions will reward children with an accurate reproduction of the seven creatures featured in the art show.

Younger children can just do their creative best as this is not a competition. This is about cooperation. We can all do something to help.

The illustrations include the Giant Barred Frog (endangered); Rufous Scrub Bird (endangered); Spotted Tail Quoll (vulnerable); Glossy Black Cockatoo (considered close to endangered); Stephens Banded Snake; Sooty Owl (vulnerable, needs large tree hollows) and the Wompoo Fruit dove (vulnerable)

Most of these creatures and many more, including the Koala, the Yellow Bellied Glider, the Powerful Owl, the Little Lorikeet and The Stuttering Frog (main habitat now the Dorrigo/Bellingen eastern escarpment) are also considered to be vulnerable or endangered.

Loss and degradation of forest habitat from logging, clearfelling and vegetation clearing are the main dangers facing these species and their ability to survive. The sheets explain how logging affects each individual animal and how you can help.

The plan is to bring them back completed with your child's name and age clearly written on the art by 5pm Friday 19, to a participating venue.

They will then be displayed .in Bellingen shop windows on Saturday July 20 at 11am.

This photo of the spectacular Wompoo Fruit Doves eating Bangalow Palm berries was taken by Peter Hardinge in the Kalang Headwaters. These birds rely on the forest fruit and dense forest canopy shelter to survive.