All eyes on Pence's daughters, Charlotte and Audrey

US Vice-President Mike Pence has arrived in Sydney, with his wife Karen and two daughters Audrey and Charlotte in tow, for his first official visit to Australia.

As the four Pences make their way around the city with his entourage of departmental advisors, Secret Service officers, communications staff and other personnel, all eyes are on Charlotte and Audrey.

Audrey, 22, the youngest of Mike Pence's three children (his son Michael is the oldest), describes herself as "politically independent, socially liberal". She has, however, also previously voted for her father.

An international affairs major at Boston's Northeastern University and an aspiring journalist, Audrey told Indianapolis television news station WTHR in 2013 that her father was proud of her for having independent political views, even though they may be at odds with his own.

"Probably the person I get the most respect from is my dad on that ... he tells me so many times, 'I am proud of you for having your own opinions and looking into things'," she said.

In 2015, she travelled to Turkey as part of a journalism work experience program, where she wrote a number of stories, including one about literacy among Afghan women and another about bride kidnapping in Kyrgyzstan.

Her time in Turkey also led to a shared byline on a story about the mass killings of Armenians under the Ottoman Empire, which was published on CNN - the media organisation her father's boss US President Donald Trump has repeatedly called "fake news".

According to her LinkedIn page she completed a four-month stint as a political and economic intern at the US Department of State in December 2016. She also reportedly spent a month in Amman, Jordan, studying Arabic and a semester abroad in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina studying international conflict and negotiation.

Audrey and her sister Charlotte, 23, are thought to be very close, despite Audrey professing more liberal views than her sibling.

Charlotte, a filmmaker, once posted on Twitter that all her friends were "just versions of my sister" - a comment that perhaps also reflects her sister's self-described socially-liberal leanings.

"I would say that most of my friends are not very political or if they are, they're very liberal," Charlotte told DePaulia, the newspaper from her alma mater DePaul University, in August last year.

Best friends!

A post shared by Charlotte Rose Pence (@charlotterosepence) on

In the same interview, the 23-year-old described herself as "more of a moderate or independent", and said she doesn't always agree with the policies of her father and Donald Trump.

"I'm not really a political person. I think I have views that go across the board, I'd say that I'm more of a moderate or independent than really have specific-aligned views," she said.

Like her sister, Charlotte considers herself a writer, and has published a number of poems, short stories and articles. In a 2014 article, Believing In God and Other 21st Century Burdens she pens a passionate defence of her religious beliefs, describing the awkwardness and isolation of being a "believer" in a society that assumes nobody believes in God anymore.

"In a world of open-mindedness and supposed peace between people of different backgrounds, where is it that a believer fits in?" she writes.

"We seem to think that being intelligent means having free thought. Okay. But what if that thought is free of inspirations? What if it is free of beauty? ??? If my free thought is free of magic and unexplainable forces and the abundance of love from something that is more than human, then I don't want it."

Charlotte graduated from DePaul University in 2016 with degrees in Digital Cinema and English - Creative Writing. According to her online resum?? and social media accounts she is currently working at Boston-based video production company Epiphany Story Lab and has written and directed a number of short films, including For the Records, an interactive documentary about mental health issues. She also once volunteered on an organic vegetable farm in Ojos, Spain, according to her CV.

But her true inspiration lies much closer to home. "I would say, honestly, my dad is my hero," she told DePaulia, when asked what she would tell people about her dad, if she could choose just one thing.

"He's a dreamer. He encourages the best in everybody, whether it's family or staff or people he just meets."

Fairfax Media

This story All eyes on Pence's daughters, Charlotte and Audrey first appeared on The Sydney Morning Herald.