Jordan Duffy fined for supplying MDMA before death of girlfriend Janie Roberts

Jordan Duffy (2nd from right) arrives at Newtown Court for sentencing. Jordan gave his girlfriend Janie Panton Roberts MDMA pills and she later died. Newtown, Sydney. March, 2017. Photo : Kate Geraghty Photo: Kate Geraghty
Jordan Duffy (2nd from right) arrives at Newtown Court for sentencing. Jordan gave his girlfriend Janie Panton Roberts MDMA pills and she later died. Newtown, Sydney. March, 2017. Photo : Kate Geraghty Photo: Kate Geraghty

A young man who supplied the capsules of MDMA that his girlfriend took before she died has been sentenced to a 12-month good behaviour bond and fined $800.

Jordan Duffy, 20, and Janie Panton Roberts, 21, were at a party at Petersham Inn on June 4 when he supplied her with three MDMA capsules.

The court heard that Duffy bought pills from a work colleague at the club and gave three to Ms Panton Roberts, a former Mackellar Girls School student, and took some himself.

The next morning, the pair were at a house in Marrickville, when she fell ill. She had died by the time paramedics arrived.

Ms Panton Roberts' mother, Kerry Roberts, stormed out when the sentence was delivered in the Newtown Local Court on Friday afternoon.

An emotional Ms Roberts had previously told the court that Duffy should not get a "a slap on the wrist" and that she wanted him to receive a jail sentence.

Outside court, Ms Roberts said: "My baby's dead and he gets [twelve] months good behaviour."

"I don't think it's right???.The way I see it is the legal system is not going to help me."

In delivering her sentence, magistrate Margaret Quinn stressed she was "at pains" to highlight that Duffy was not legally responsible for Ms Panton Roberts's death.

"The decision to take the drugs was made by both Mr Duffy and Ms Panton Roberts," Ms Quinn said.

"The seriousness of the charge and Mr Duffy's moral culpability can only be assessed against the charge of supply prohibited drug."

Ms Quinn said the pair had been having an "ordinary night" that ended in tragedy.

"Young people in our community who are taking drugs have no regard for the consequences. It is only when there is a terrible outcome as a result."

Ms Quinn accepted that Duffy, who had no previous criminal record, was very remorseful and had cared deeply for Ms Panton Roberts.

The court heard that he has been seeing a psychologist and is now planning to complete his HSC.

"I'm looking at his age, what has occurred, the distressing symptoms he has felt, but I am reminded that the family is here. I am reminded that they also are suffering grief," Ms Quinn said.

Extensive media coverage of the case did not amount to extra-curial punishment, the court heard, because the reports were factual and did not harass or attack him.

While Duffy's lawyer had submitted that a conviction should not be recorded against his client, Ms Quinn said that would not be appropriate.

In a letter to the court read during a sentencing hearing earlier this year, Duffy said he felt "numb" and thought about his dead girlfriend constantly.

"That morning haunts me every day and I wish I could change my actions," he wrote in the letter, quoted in court by his lawyer.

"It feels like a heavy cloud of guilt is always following me."

This story Jordan Duffy fined for supplying MDMA before death of girlfriend Janie Roberts first appeared on The Sydney Morning Herald.