Racing through the South African grasslands on horseback

FLYING HIGH: Home after a long dusty ride through the grasslands in South 
Africa. Springbok and baboons were common sights enroute.

FLYING HIGH: Home after a long dusty ride through the grasslands in South Africa. Springbok and baboons were common sights enroute.

Isabel and Sharon Foster are still landing after their amazing experience at the Fauresmith 200km National Endurance ride in South Africa two weeks ago.

“It was a totally awesome experience … every day there was another wow! factor,” Sharon said.

“There were about 400 of us camped in this big fenced area and we were hosted by the most beautiful family with whom we felt instantly comfortable.”

Daily dust and heat, night-time ice cold temperatures

Daily dust and heat, night-time ice cold temperatures

“We had no idea what to expect when we landed, but we needn’t have worried, we were made to feel totally at home and the horses we leased from them were really well-trained and well-cared for.”

The ride itself takes place over three days across 204km of sandy, dusty, at times rocky terrain.

“It was the middle of winter but the days were up to 20 degrees and there is absolutely no shade. Night temperatures got down to about minus seven degrees with sheets of ice on our tents. 

"It was such a rollercoaster, we are so grateful to all those who helped us get there"

"It was such a rollercoaster, we are so grateful to all those who helped us get there"

“At night there were lots of stories around the camp fires – the atmosphere was so friendly and supportive.”

Only 48 per cent of all riders finished the course but the Bellingen pair were not in that category.

“It was a great feeling to be part of the finishing group. We were part of the Australian team, there were five of us, all from NSW and three of us finished. It really was an incredible feeling to be wearing those green and gold uniforms.”

They finished with the very respectable time of 12 hours 24 minutes and 28 seconds.

Isabel walking her horse up a steep slope. Photo: Manie Ward

Isabel walking her horse up a steep slope. Photo: Manie Ward

In publicity about the race, it is described as follows:

Picture it: horse riders flying across wintry Free State grasslands; 400 horses encamped with their riders, support teams and spectators, numbering in the thousands, gathering round fires each night to discuss the glories and tragedies of the day; and riders getting up at midnight in freezing conditions to check on their horses.

This is the legendary Fauresmith endurance ride, the highlight of the South African endurance horse-riding calendar.

Every year in July, endurance horse riders descend on the Free State town of Fauresmith for this 201km marathon, known as the Fauresmith 200. Not for the faint-hearted, this race through the veld (grasslands) personifies excitement, adrenaline and achievement. And for many of the riders, it is the realisation of a life’s dream.

Fit and fed to run fast and hard, the horses are ready to race. While the nights are freezing, the days can get extremely warm, and the health of the horses is closely monitored over the three days. Their heart rate and muscles are checked every 25km by registered veterinarians (when the riders let their horses rest for 20 minutes), and any over-strained horses are disqualified.

The race is a veritable obstacle course through the veld, with plenty of pitfalls, including rocks and loose stones, eroded gullies, holes, and fence posts concealed by the grass. Experienced Fauresmith riders caution all newcomers to pace themselves and their horses carefully if they wish to complete the three days. 'Keep a level head and keep in control,' is the motto of this race.

Many are the tales of camaraderie and sportsmanship in this highly competitive event, in which top riders have been known to stop and dismount to help a fellow rider in trouble.

The spectators, on the other hand, feed off the collective nervous energy and excitement to cheer on the riders as they cross the finishing line to the soundtrack of Chariots of Fire.

Fauresmith and the surrounding areas are spectator- and tourist-friendly, and once the race is run, take a few days to explore the Free State's hospitality and adventure offerings.

For more information: www.southafrica.net/za/en/articles/entry/article-fauresmith-endurance-race-free-state

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop